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Stupid Question: What is the major advantage

Sep 18, 2009 at 3:53 AM

Hi All,

I have a fully working version of TheBeerHouse hosted on GoDaddy that is fully working except PayPal.  I am currently forced to move to a new Web Hosting company.  The version I am using is the original version created in AP.NET 2.0 and using MSSQL 2005.

Question: I would love to know what some of the advantages are to this latest version.  And what are the challenges of taking and integrating changes form the older version (which has been customized) into the newer version.  I did not customize everything, so for example, the Polls works without changes.  Can I easily pick and choice which modules to “upgraded”?  Or would it be wiser to purchase the book and download the newer version, and modify the newer version?

Cheers,

MEA

 

Sep 19, 2009 at 4:22 AM
Edited Sep 19, 2009 at 2:21 PM

>>>Can I easily pick and choice which modules to “upgraded”? 

My understanding is that you can include web forms within an ASP.NET MVC project. Therefore, you may be able to choose which modules to upgrade.

>>>Or would it be wiser to purchase the book and download the newer version, and modify the newer version?

Buy the book, better yet, buy a few books...You will need a working knowledge of ASP.NET MVC, C# extension methods, lambda expressions, and LINQ.

There are no server controls or code-behind files in ASP.NET MVC. My suggestion is to download the new version, read the book, and then decide how to refactor your existing code.

>>>I would love to know what some of the advantages are to this latest version.

1. URL Routing: This is critical for search engine optimization. The major search engines do not traverse query strings appended to URLs (sideNote: URL Rewriting is an alternative to URL Routing IF you decide against implementing the ASP.NET MVC architecture).

2. Unit Tests: Although the book doesn't discuss unit testing, Nick Berardi has announced that the next sample code release will include unit tests. Unit tests are a component of test driven development (TDD). TDD leads to agile coding...which leads to more satisfied customers...which leads to...mo...$$$

3. MVC design pattern: your business logic goes in Controller classes, separate from your presentation layer. This de-coupling will allow you to reuse your Models and Controllers with multiple user interfaces (ie: desktop, web, mobile devices).

4. LINQ: substantially reduces the amount of code you need to write.

5. Once you have a good working knowledge of these subject matters, you will produce better software in less time.

6. FWIW - I get the sense that Microsoft is moving towards the MVC pattern for the desktop as well as the web. You might want to check out Microsoft's Prism v2, I think it is an MVC framework for WPF and SilverLight.

HTH

 

Sep 19, 2009 at 5:00 AM

Hi HTH,

Thanks for the advise.  Sounds like right now it makes sense to focus on my software (C# .NET), which will be the bread and butter of the company, and continue to use the existing software based on the older book (e.g., ASP.NET 2.0).  It is working and I am happy with what it does for me.  You have been very, very helpful.  Agree, to do this right I will need a bit of "learning" so I think I better wait a bit and focuse on my bread and butter.

Cheers,

Michael